Whilst Valentine’s Day is widely known for being an opportunity to make a profit out of loved up and lonely hearts, its roots stem from purer beginnings. Roman holidays to celebrate and protect true love as well as Chaucer’s own efforts to establish the tradition of romantic love in all its chivalry (and we love Chaucer for this, and many other things), make February 14th as good a day as any to remind us why we love, love so much.

At Researching Reform we make this celebration our own (as everyone should) and for us it means remembering the importance of giving love, even if not yet fully scientifically proven (and yes, we’re getting there), to our children.

Today, we will be thinking about children all over the world. Those children who are being hurt in the pursuit of power, those who have been abused by adults whose savage cruelty have left an indelible mark and those children who continue to suffer. These children all need many things, including unconditional love.

So we would like to take this opportunity to remind our peers and ministers dealing with child welfare matters that they cannot lose sight of this often elusive element in child welfare policy, and that it is just as important as food, and shelter for our children.

We would also like to remind established members of the Statutory Inquiry into Child Abuse that they are working to provide a safe and loving space for the children of the future, and that the survivors they will be working with were also once children denied of a loving home. And when they demand your attention and seek you out for questioning, that you listen, to each and every one, as many times as they need you to.

To one and all, we wish you a happy day, filled with the kind of love that makes your heart leap, whether it’s the touch of your soulmate’s hand or the taste of heart-shaped chocolate. And for all our parents who are not with their children today, we dedicate this post to you, and believe with all our hearts that true love is never, truly forgotten.

V Day

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